Local farmer improves soil health with cover crops

Local farmer improves soil health with cover crops

Posted: Friday, April 26, 2013 8:00 pm

Ronnie Yeargin of Yeargin Farms in the Dresden/Greenfield area has found a new tool in improving the productivity of his farmland in the way of planting cover crop species in his cropland fields after crop harvest.
Yeargin has been experimenting in the use of cover crops in his operation to increase the productivity of his farmland and has planted different species such as annual rye and crimson clover to see how cover crops can increase soil health thereby maximizing profits.
The use of cover crops keeps a plant cover on the land year around and which yields a number of benefits. Benefits include improved soil fertility, weed control, increased water holding capacity and infiltration, reduced fertilizer input, soil compaction, increased soil organic matter, less soil erosion and improved biodiversity in the soil profile. Yeargin has also used cover crops for late winter and early spring supplemental grazing in his beef cattle operation.
Agricultural producers in Weakley County interested in learning more about the benefits of cover crops are urged to talk to producers such as Yeargin and may also contact the local office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service at 731-364-5430.
Incentive cost share for installing cover crops may be available under the Environmental Quality Incentives Program administered by NRCS. USDA prohibits discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, marital or family status
For more information, contact your local USDA/NRCS field office at 364-5430, or go to the NRCS-Tennessee website at http://www.tn.nrcs.usda.gov/.  USDA prohibits discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, marital or family status.  (Not all prohibited basis apply to all programs.)  Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET  Center at (202) 720-2600 (Voice and TDD).

Published in The WCP 4.25.13

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