Briefs from the outdoors

Briefs from the outdoors

Posted: Friday, April 26, 2013 12:00 pm

NASHVILLE (AP) — Four Nashville fishermen were cited for going well over the state fishing limits when they caught 420 white bass in what wildlife officials are calling one of the biggest fish poaching cases in the state.
According to the Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/10mreiT), Phay Souksavong, Khamnovan Keomanychanh, Kongham Phenevongsa and So Akhom were fishing on March 20 below the dam on Cheatham Lake when Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency officer Brad Bagwell confronted them.
The limit on white bass per day per licensed fisherman is 15, but they had 360 more white bass than they were legally allowed.
TWRA spokesman Doug Markham said the fines could amount to thousands of dollars. He said it appeared the four men found an area where the white bass were schooled heavily and getting ready to spawn.
Information from: The Tennessean, http://www.tennessean.com
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Biologists are planning to put tracking bands on four peregrine falcon chicks that hatched inside a falcon nest box at a power plant in southwest Louisville.
A statement from Louisville Gas & Electric and the Kentucky Department Fish and Wildlife Resources says state biologists will briefly remove the chicks from their next on Friday and put leg bands on them. The statement says the action is being taken because the chicks are expected to take flight for the first time in coming days.
The bands will allow biologists to identify each falcon and track its success.
Meanwhile, LG&E says a webcam it installed at the site earlier this year so that people could watch the chicks as they grow has attracted 22,000 viewers from 52 countries.
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TONAWANDA, N.Y. (AP) — An American bald eagle found injured in a ditch along a western New York road is recuperating at a Buffalo-area animal shelter.
The Buffalo News reports (http://bit.ly/12ES4G7 ) that the bird was found earlier this month along Route 394 in the town of Westfield, near the Pennsylvania border in Chautauqua County.
Beverly Jones, assistant director of wildlife services at the SPCA, says the male eagle was somehow injured several weeks before he was found and his fractured wing was already healed. She says the bird will never fly again.
Because the bird has a calm demeanor and hasn’t exhibited aggressive behavior, SPCA officials say he may be an ideal candidate for public education purposes.
The eagle could remain at the SPCA shelter in Tonawanda if federal wildlife officials determine it’s a suitable permanent home for him.
Information from: The Buffalo News, http://www.buffalonews.com
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Published in The Messenger 4.26.13

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