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Revolutionary War memorial to be unveiled in Hopkinsville

Revolutionary War memorial to be unveiled in Hopkinsville

Posted: Thursday, July 5, 2012 8:00 pm

HOPKINSVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A new memorial to Revolutionary War soldiers from Christian County is set to be unveiled at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery-West.
Joe Woosley, a 74-year-old Hopkinsville resident, tells the Kentucky New Era  (http://bit.ly/KYN1t1 ) that one of the 71 names on the memorial is that of his great-great-great-great uncle, Thomas Woosley.
Efforts to recognize Revolutionary War soldiers from the area can be traced back to 1912, when the Daughters of the American Revolution erected plaques at a local cemetery to honor Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Christian County. The group used pension records to find the names of 37 soldiers who served in the war.
In 2007, a local chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution discovered there were names missing from the plaques because those soldiers had not lived long enough to draw a pension. The group compiled a list of additional soldiers who needed to be recognized, and its efforts resulted in the memorial.
The chapter collected $8,000 in donations, and the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs awarded the group a matching grant to complete the monument.
The monument was erected at the veterans cemetery June 6 and was to be unveiled on the Fourth of July.
Bob Fears, president of the John Manire chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, s aid there are thousands of descendants of the 71 soldiers still living in Christian, Todd and Trigg counties.
As for Thomas Woosley, Joe Woosley said his research shows he was born in Buckingham County, Va., June 2, 1760, and enlisted in the Continental Army in March 1777. He died May 12, 1856, in Christian County.
In a small cemetery off Kentucky 1026, the location of Thomas Woosley’s grave was nearly lost. Joe Woosley found the gravesite and replaced the marker in 1992. When Joe Woosley found it, Thomas Woosley’s tombstone was broken and covered by dirt. Now, it stands alongside a handful of other ones under the shade of some nearby trees.
Woosley helps to take care of the secluded cemetery, which is on private property, along with one other small historic cemetery.
Information from: Kentucky New Era, http://www.kentuckynewera.com
Published in The Messenger 7.5.12

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