Our readers write

Our readers write

Posted: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 7:00 pm

Son defends dad in poaching case
To The Editor:
This letter is in regard to the article written in last week’s paper titled “Northwest Tennessee men sentenced for poaching” of which my father was the subject of. 
The article does not mention that earlier that day, my father had spoken to the game warden in that area.  The game warden told my father the bears around the area had become a real nuisance lately and to shoot one if he got the opportunity.  My father was acting under this notion when he shot the bear. At no point in the conversation did the game warden mention bear season did not start for a week or that there would be any repercussions for killing a bear. In fact, he encouraged it. 
My father is an honest hunter and the best man I know. Anyone who has spent time with him and heard him talk about his love for the outdoors would know he would never kill an animal out of season simply for the thrill of it. I remember the hunt my father took me on when I killed my first deer. I was nervous, cold, excited and slightly ready to be back home in bed all at once. I didn’t enjoy hunting as much as my Dad did but I enjoyed spending time with him and I knew how much it meant to him having me there. But then that big doe came into view and I’m not sure which of us was more excited.
I got a good shot on her and Dad could not have been happier. We went down to see the doe and Dad told me how proud he was and how well I shot. He went on to thank God for sending us the doe and for giving us such a beautiful morning to hunt on. That was when I realized how special being in the woods and hunting was to Dad. It was how Dad experienced God. He found a peace in the woods up in his tree stand that often eluded him in his busy work schedule. The woods were a kind of sanctuary where Dad could be alone to think, pray and just unwind in beautiful scenery. Understanding this gave me a greater appreciation for being out in the woods surrounded by nature. I will always be thankful to Dad for that.
In my parent’s bedroom, above Dad’s dresser, there is an old stitched Cherokee prayer that is hanging in a picture frame. It reads:
“Dear God, Thank you for another day on this beautiful green Earth. Thank You for the many blessings you have provided me in this life: the sun, the stars, the trees and grass, and the sweet fresh breeze on my face. Thank You for sending this magnificent creature into my life. Help him find his way to You and help me find the best in me, so that when I someday cross the great river we may meet again, and again I may thrill at the sight of him.”
This prayer reflects the way my father feels about his hunts. The animals he kills are not simply trophies to him. They are a blessing to the earth from God and Dad is always thankful for the opportunity and the ability he has been blessed with in getting to hunt them. Dad makes mistakes, but he is an honest man who learns from them and most importantly grows from them. His love and dedication to the outdoors is rivaled only by that to his family. I will always be proud to call him a good and respectful hunter as well as an exceptional father.                
Chase Manley
Martin
———
Reader ‘offended’ by the president
To The Editor:
With all due respect to our president who found it “offensive” that someone would question the credibility of his administration, I find it “offensive” the credit rating of the United States has been downgraded for the first time in our history.
I also find it “very offensive” a United States ambassador was murdered for the first time in 30 years, while the state department sat and viewed the happenings live from a video captured by a drone with no immediate action taken.
I also find it “extremely offensive” that while most intelligent people immediately recognized the possibility of this being a terrorist attack taking place on the anniversary of 9/11, his administration attempted to write it off as a reaction to an idiotic youtube video, even going before the United Nations with such, and making us the ridicule of the world which knew better.
Finally, I find it “ultimately offensive” that Fort Hood, the New York bomber and, now, this event were all attempted to be swept away as non-terrorist activities when all have been proven to be otherwise.
The question for each of us should be: Are we safer now than we were four years ago? I not only disagree, I am “offended” that we are not.
Ken Reynolds
Martin

Published in The WCP 10.30.12

Leave a Comment