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Broken New Year’s resolution? Make believe it’s Jan. 1 again

Broken New Year’s resolution? Make believe it’s Jan. 1 again

Posted: Friday, January 27, 2012 8:00 pm
By: by DONNA RYDER

Broken New Year’s resolution? Make believe it’s Jan. 1 again | Broken New Year’s resolution? Make believe it’s Jan. 1 again
So, today is the 27th of January. Have you already broken every New Year’s resolution you made for 2012?
If so, give yourself a make-good, a do-over. Make believe it’s New Year’s Day all over again and set yourself anew on what you wanted to accomplish this year. Because really, what is New Year’s Day, but just a day?
During 2011, I received several emails giving advice on how to keep your resolutions, especially those pertaining to weight loss. One came with advice from Alexandra Jamieson, celebrity health and nutrition counselor, chef and author of “The Great American Detox Diet,” “Living Vegan for Dummies” and “Vegan Cooking for Dummies.”
She says you need to understand where you are now, what you’re eating and what you want to change.
“Write down everything. How you feel when you wake up. What cravings you have. What your diet is like. What your exercise routine is (if any). What you would like to feel and look like,” Jamieson says.
She advised to get support. Talk with someone who has been there before. Read the blogs of experts, watch inspiring movies online or listen to radio shows on the area of health that interests you the most. Find a “tribe” of people who are dedicated to making the same changes you want to accomplish.
Make a plan. Figure out what it is you want to do and then make a plan on how you will accomplish it.
Jamieson says to be more healthy, be seasonal. “Use seasonal, local produce as much as possible. When you eat veggies from a nearby farm, they offer you the energy and nutrients that support you where you are and when you are.”
For example, she says, eating iceberg lettuce and watermelon north of the 45th parallel in winter does not support your body in the cold, sunless months. Instead, choose winter squash, cabbage, other hearty wintergreens and apples and pears that winter over well. These fruits and veggies give you great, fresh nutrition rather than arriving depleted from half way across the world.
She says you should sleep more. “The human body is built to follow natural rhythms. Our inner body clock, called circadian rhythm, triggers the natural impulses to wake up with the sun, sleep when it’s dark, as well as a host of other natural body processes.”
Jamieson suggests an experiment: go to bed early and wake up early. Get into bed by 9 p.m. and wake up at 4 or 5 a.m. Even a few days a week of this pattern will help you feel more refreshed, healthier and those intense food cravings will release their hold on you just a bit more.
After your sleeping better, you can wake up earlier and get a good breakfast in your body.
She says to skip white, refined foods, including white flour, white sugar and white table salt. “All of these foods are stripped of nutrition, vitamins and minerals and offer only the jolt of carbohydrate or sodium. Without any supportive nutrients, your body must draw on its own precious stores to metabolize the refined food, leading to depleted energy over time.” Instead of eating white foods, candy and soda for energy, eat naturally sweet foods like sweet root veggies, fruits and whole grains.
Jamieson says it’s important to move your body. Whether it’s running, walking, swimming, biking, dancing, weight lifting or machines, just move every day, as if it were your last day on earth.
Associate Editor Donna Ryder can be contacted by email at dryder@ ucmessenger.com. Published in The Messenger 1.27.12

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