Third Review Club meets

Third Review Club meets

Posted: Tuesday, December 6, 2011 8:03 pm

The November meeting of the Third Review Club was held recently at St. James Episcopal Church in Union City.
The meeting was called to order by the president, Mary Dunavant.
The thought for the day was given by Bernice Shore.
Roll call was answered by members naming their favorite holiday.
Minutes of the October meeting were read at this time.
It was decided to present the Obion County Public Library with a memorial contribution in the name of the late Kate Jones, a longtime member of the club.
It was also decided that the Christmas luncheon be held at St. James Episcopal Church on Friday at noon. Mrs. Dunavant and Lindy Dunavant will serve as hostesses for the event. Each member agreed to bring a covered dish. The meeting was then adjourned.
Peggy Drerup presented the program on Tennessee historic homes. The Carter House is one of Tennessee’s most notable historic sites due to its part in the tragic Civil War Battle of Franklin. It was built in 1830 for Fountain Branch Carter, a merchant, surveyor and farmer from Virginia. It served as headquarters for Gen. Jacob D. Cox of the Union Army. While the battle raged, the Carter family hid in the cellar while 42,000 men fought each other. Union casualties numbered 2,362, the Confederate casualties were 6,252, with the Carter’s youngest son, Tod, among them.
The Sam Davis house, located near Smyrna, dates from about 1840. In 1863, as a member of the Coleman’s Scouts, Sam Davis was captured, tried, court-marshaled and condemned to die by the Union. When offered to have his life spared if he would reveal the source of his information, he refused, saying he would gladly give a thousand lives rather than to betray a friend or his country. He was hanged at the age of 21. The gracious home, set among oak trees, contains eight large rooms and two stairways leading to the second floor. Many original pieces grace the rooms.
Traveler’s Rest, the home of Judge John Overton, is located in south Nashville. A prominent jurist, close friend and political advisor to Andrew Jackson, Overton, a native of Virginia, came to Nashville from Kentucky in 1789. Land for the home was bought in 1796. The home, which eventually consisted of 12 rooms, became a place of business, political influence and a social center in the early life of Middle Tennessee. The Civil War laid a heavy hand on Traveler’s Rest, especially the Battle of Peach Orchard Hill.
Belle Meade has been christened Queen of Tennes-see Plantations. The large farming operation from the 1840s was an internationally recognized stable of the most famous nursery of thoroughbred racing stock. It was also the scene of social events seldom paralleled in Nashville history. In 1953, the State of Tennessee purchased the mansion and the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities has restored and maintained it since them.
Tulip Grave, the home of Andrew Jackson Donelson, has become part of the Jacksonian heritage. It was built by Andrew Jackson for his adopted son. The home is of the southern colonial architecture style with tall Doric columns supporting the beautiful frieze and pediment. There is a spiral stairway, which rises to the third floor, and there are exceptional mantels. It has been restored and furnished with period pieces. It has been maintained by the Ladies Hermitage Association since 1963.

Published in The Messenger 12.6.11

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