Meth lab remnants discovered

Meth lab remnants discovered

By CHRIS MENEES
Staff Reporter
A meth manufacturing charge was levied against a Union City man after police received a tip the illegal drug was allegedly being cooked at a South Second Street home.
Joe Willyard was charged with manufacture of meth after police conducted a search at his home at 1202 South Second St., according to a Union City Police Department report.
Police had received information Tuesday from a citizen informant who claimed meth was being cooked Monday at Willyard’s residence. Investigator Derrick O’Dell said due to believing the information to be credible, police went to Willyard’s home about 10:30 a.m. to conduct a probation search.
Willyard is currently on probation due to a Dec. 10, 2010, conviction for possession of a Schedule II controlled substance with intent. A rule of his probation states that he and his residence are subject to search at any time.
O’Dell reported he searched Willyard’s outside trash can, which was on the north side of the garage ready for pickup. He said when he arrived and passed the can, he could smell the odor he knows is associated with meth manufacturing coming from the can.
During the search, O’Dell found a plastic Vitamin Water bottle that allegedly had been used to manufacture methamphetamine, along with used plastic bags, used coffee filters and an open lithium battery package. He said the Vitamin Water bottle was hidden in a vinyl bag, which was pushed down inside a folded cardboard box covered with other items of trash.
The bottle allegedly contained “remnants and residue of the manufacturing process” and also smelled “heavily of chemical,” O’Dell reported.
“This smell is distinct and is exactly what I have smelled in a prior worked meth lab,” the investigator reported.
The used coffee filters and used plastic bags were pushed down into a plastic cup and one of the bags had a cut-off corner. He said the bags were zip-lock style, which is the type of bag allegedly used to store liquid products during the manufacturing process.
According to police, a cut-off corner is how the liquid is removed, coffee filters are used to strain finished product from the liquid processed in the bottle and lithium batteries are used in the manufacturing process.
Police also searched Willyard’s shed. There, O’Dell said he found a lunch box which contained plastic bags and unused coffee filters, as well as wire ties and other electrical type tools.
Willyard told police it was his electrical kit, but police reported the items were similar to what was being used in the lab allegedly found in Willyard’s trash can.
Due to the discovery of the items, police arrested Willyard for manufacture of meth. He told police it was not his lab and that a cook did not occur at his house, but the lab was brought to his house, and he claimed he was not the one who put the lab in the trash and insinuated it was another person who was at the home, according to the report.
O’Dell reported Willyard allegedly admitted to using meth and that he was on probation for possession with intent, adding that Willyard wanted to make a deal with police and not be charged in exchange for other information. However, no deal was made and the charge was levied.

Published in The Messenger 11.10.11

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