Reelfoot DAR meets

Reelfoot DAR meets

Posted: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 12:03 am

Reelfoot DAR meets

The Reelfoot DAR Chapter recently held a memorial service for the late Louise Moss Kirkland.
The recent meeting of the Reelfoot Daughters of the American Revolution at the Obion County Museum in Union City began with a short program on conservation led by Penny Hepler, who facilitated an activity which emphasized the astounding amount of waste generated daily by this nation and suggestions as to how to curtail waste and conserve natural resources.
Following this exercise a memorial service was held for the late Louise Moss Kirkland, who became a member of the Reelfoot DAR Chapter in August 1973. Her Revolutionary Patriot was George Reynolds of Virginia.  The memorial service was conducted by chapter chaplain Linda Lofton.  Family members attending the service were Hunter Kirkland, Laurie Kirkland, Charles Kirkland, John Kirkland, and Lee and Connie Fry.
 Following the memorial service, Regent Mary Coleman called the meeting to order and led the group through the DAR Ritual assisted by chaplain Linda Lofton.  Peggy Drerup led the Pledge of Allegiance to the American flag, Virginia Gibson led the American’s Creed, Linda Lofton led in the singing of “America,” Martha Kendall led the salute to the Tennessee flag and Sharon Stone led the recitation to the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States of America.
Linda Lofton presented the Flag Code, reminding the chapter of the three objectives of DAR in regards to our flag:  To keep the flag flying and to protect in under all conditions.  To learn the history and proper use of the flag and to educate our citizens.  And thirdly, to participate in chapter and community flag events and projects.   
She added that there are 23 Honored Days to proudly display our flag each year.
The Indian Minutes were presented by Gloria Howell.  The olden Cherokee devised a simple, yet seemingly complex belief system which continues to be recognized by Cherokee today as an integral part of day-to-day life.  Certain numbers such as seven and four played an important role in ceremonies.  They held special regard for the owl and cougar.  Very basic to Cherokee belief system is the premise that good is rewarded while evil is punished.
The President General’s Message was read by Penny Hepler.  Oct. 11, 2011, marks the 121st anniversary of the founding of the National Society.  DAR founders were moved by circumstances of their time in history to honor the memory of their revolutionary ancestors and promote historic preservation, education, and patriotism.  Its focus remains the same today.
The National Defender report was given by Ann Thompson, who summarized the farewell speech given by Defense Secretary Robert Gates to West Point cadets.  He stated, “The odds of repeating another Afghanistan or Iraq-invading, pacifying, and administering a large third-world country-may be low.” He ended his speech by calling for decreased “bureaucratic rigidity” in order to retain, challenge, and inspire bright, young officers to lead the service of the future.
The treasurer’s report was given by Hazel Williams.  Old business and new business were addressed.  A short Founder’s Day program was presented by Regent Coleman.
The program of the day was presented by Dwight Tittle, a licensed massage therapist, of Revive Day Spa in Union City.  He delivered an interesting message to the group pertaining to the natural healing of the body and the importance of a healthy blood flow to muscles to relieve stress and muscular pain.  Tittle addressed the many questions asked by those present.
The meeting was adjourned and delicious refreshments and a period of fellowship was enjoyed by the group.  
Hostesses were Gail McConnell, Ruth Weldon, and Ann Thompson.   
The DAR Good Citizen’s Tea will be today at 4 p.m.  

wcp 11/8/11

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