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Reelfoot Rural Ministries receives $25,000 grant

Reelfoot Rural Ministries receives $25,000 grant

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today selected recipients in 50 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for grants to make critical repairs and improve housing conditions for low- and very-low-income rural residents.
Reelfoot Rural Ministries will be receiving $25,000 for that purpose.
Rural Development Deputy Under Secretary Doug O’Brien announced the recipients today on Secretary Vilsack’s behalf while attending a local Farm Bill listening session in Selma, Ala.
“Providing safe housing to rural residents is a key to maintaining stable communities and creating jobs,” Vilsack said. “Across America, USDA works in partnership with Tribes, community organizations and non-profit groups to improve living conditions for thousands of rural residents.”
The support Vilsack is announcing today is being provided through USDA Rural Development’s Housing Preservation Grants program. Funds are provided to intermediaries such as town or county governments, public agencies, federally recognized Indian Tribes and non-profit and faith-based and community organizations. These organizations then distribute the grants to homeowners and owners of multi-family rental properties or cooperative dwellings who rent to low- and very-low-income residents.
Grants may be used to make general repairs, such as installing or improving plumbing or providing or enhancing access to people with disabilities. Funds may also be used to weatherize and make homes more energy efficient.
For example, Western Illinois Regional Council, a community action agency, will use a $75,000 Rural Development grant along with more than $476,000 in state funds to help up to 17 very-low-income households in a four-county area make repairs to reduce energy use. A $58,582 grant to the Coquille Indian Housing Authority will help replace 54 wind- and water-damaged roofs on the homes of low-income residents in Oregon’s Coos County. The entire project, which will cost more than $860,000, leverages funding from the Coquille Indian Tribe and other agencies over the next two years.
In another effort, the Southwest Georgia Community Action Council will use a $159,185 Rural Development grant and $135,408 from other government and private sources to help up to 30 very-low-income families rehabilitate their homes in a12-county area.

Published in The Messenger 10.28.11

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