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Pair work to preserve trail blazed by Daniel Boone

Pair work to preserve trail blazed by Daniel Boone

Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 8:01 pm

RICHMOND, Ky. (AP) — Two physicians are working together to preserve a trail blazed by Daniel Boone in 1775 from East Tennessee to central Kentucky.
Dr. Sam Compton of Nashville and Dr. John Fox of Lexington, Ky., are members of the Boone Society and say the trail known as Boone’s Trace could be turned into an avenue of economic development, education and recreation, according to The Richmond Register (http://bit.ly/qPXgnI).
The men recently held a meeting in Richmond, Ky., near where the trail ends at Fort Boonesborough to share their idea with the public.
Boone marked the trail from the Watauga Settlements on the Holston River in East Tennessee to Fort Boonesborough on the Kentucky River with the help of 30 axmen.
It followed a path used by buffaloes and American Indians.
Over the years, the trail has been almost forgotten, the two men said, but they want to change that.
Author K. Randell Jones, who wrote a book about Boone’s journeys, said Boone’s Trace could become “an economic engine” if it is marked properly and promoted.
He said other trails have been successfully preserved and promoted, including the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, which trail marks the route settlers took from Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina to the Battle of Kings Mountain during the Revolutionary War.
Boone’s Trace passes through the Cumberland Gap National Historic Park and three Kentucky state parks — Pine Mountain in Bell County, Levi Jackson in Laurel County and Fort Boonesborough in Madison County.
Fox said the directors of the Cumberland Gap and Levi Jackson parks are interested in the idea.
Some areas of Boone’s Trace are already marked.
Compton said the Daughters of the American Revolution put up 14 markers in 1915, including one in front of Boone Tavern in Berea and another on the courthouse lawn in Richmond.
The group put up another seven makers in 1942 in Laurel County. Published in The Messenger 10.12.11

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