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Beware of scam

Beware of scam

Posted: Tuesday, September 27, 2011 2:14 pm

The Messenger, September 27, 2011
Police cannot over-emphasize the importance of never giving out personal account information, credit card numbers or personal identification numbers over the telephone or by email.
Nonetheless, people still fall victim to scams every day.
The Messenger has received information about another apparent telephone scam, being called the Visa and Mastercard telephone credit card scam.
The person calling claims to be from a credit card company’s security and fraud department and even gives a badge number. He claims the victim’s credit card — the number of which he already knows — has been flagged for an unusual purchase and he is calling to verify, then asks about a specific purchase. When the victim indicates they did not buy the item, the caller claims they will issue a credit to their account and further claims the credit will be sent to the victim’s mailing address before their next statement. After the victim verifies the address, the caller claims they will start a fraud investigation and gives the victim a six-digit “control number.”
Then, the caller tells the victim he needs to verify the victim is in possession of the credit card and asks the victim to provide the three-digit security number from the back of their card.
The victims of this scam actually say very little, other than answering yes or no questions, and the caller never asks for the card number, but rather the security number.
One victim reportedly called back on the 800-number listed on his credit card and was told by the card issuer’s real security department that it was a scam and a purchase of nearly $500 had just been charged to the card.
Union City Police Chief Joe Garner said people never need to give out personal information — especially PINs or security numbers — over the phone or by email. He said legitimate companies never do business in this manner and anyone seeking the information by phone or email is most likely a scammer.
Garner said scams should be reported to local police so they can go on record and be entered into a database. Unfortunately, many scams originate outside the United States and are difficult to trace.

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