Reelfoot DAR meets

Reelfoot DAR meets

Posted: Monday, March 14, 2011 8:01 pm

The Reelfoot Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution met recently at the Obion County Museum.
The meeting was called to order by regent Mary Coleman, who read a portion of Patricia Rhoton’s obituary as a memorial to her. Ms. Rhoton was honorary state regent and Tennessee State Regent from 2001-04.
Mrs. Coleman led the group’s DAR ritual, with assistance from Gail McConnell. Gloria Howell led in the Pledge of Allegiance to the American flag and Ann Culp led in the recitation of the American Creed, followed by the singing of “America” led by Penny Hepler.
Sharon Stone led in the pledge to the Tennessee flag, followed by the reading of the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution led by Ann Thompson.
Mrs. Stone reviewed interesting facts pertaining to the Flag Code. Previous to Flag Day, June 14, 1923, there were no federal or state regulations governing display of the United States Flag. On this date, 66 national groups attended a National Flag Conference and adopted a flag code based on the Army and Navy procedures relating to proper display of the U.S. flag.  How the Flag Code is interpreted by different organizations can be fairly tested by determining that: “No disrespect should be shown to the Flag of the United States of America.” Mrs. Stone continued in her presentation by reviewing respectful and proper times, occasions, positions and manner of displaying the flag.
The Indian Minutes were presented by Ms. Howell, who continued to provide information focusing on Cherokee tribes which were found along the Tennessee River in 1540 by the DeSoto expedition. By 1629, English traders met the Cherokee as they worked their way west into the Appalachians. This is when important changes began to occur for the Cherokee nation.
For many years, the Cherokee warred with the many neighboring tribes throughout the south east territory of the United States. In 1721, the Cherokee made their first cession of land by signing a treaty which established a boundary between the Cherokee and the British settlements. This treaty also established trade and an alliance between the British and Cherokee. Regardless of the treaties signed between 1721 and 1768, the Cherokee continued to be pushed further west and to lose territory.  
Mrs. Hepler read the president general’s message, which she penned as she was about to embark on her visits to 15 state conferences. She encouraged all states and chapters to work to “Preserve the Past, Enhance the Present, Invest in the Future.”
Mrs. Thompson reported from the National Defender. The report focused on how our forefathers risked it all by writing and signing the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The American Revolution had already begun, and the signers of this document were considered traitors and enemies of the British. They could have been hanged if caught. Many signers did have their homes looted, their businesses and farms destroyed, and some were put in prison. They were willing to risk everything for liberty. The article encouraged all Americans to remember this as they live out lives in a nation free to pursue and value individual rights and liberty.
Treasurer Hazel Williams gave the treasurer’s report. Old and new business were discussed.
The program was presented by Mrs. Coleman. Those present were provided information on the DAR School Project 2010-2013. The National DAR School theme is “Soar with Education,” using a collection of three balloons as the symbol. The three balloons signify friendship, service and commitment to our schools.  
Following the program, the meeting was adjourned and delicious refreshments were enjoyed by all.  Hostesses were Ms. Culp and Ms. Hepler.

Published in The Messenger 3.14.11

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