When it rains, it pours and even floods

When it rains, it pours and even floods

Posted: Thursday, March 10, 2011 9:09 pm
By: AP, staff reports

From AP, staff reports
Obion County is on track for another big year of rainfall if totals continue present trends throughout the year.
So far this year, officials at the A.L. Strub Wastewater Treatment Plant have recorded 14.595 inches of rainfall. The last time Union City saw numbers near that was in 2006 when 14.31 inches of rainfall had fallen by March 11 and in 2008 when 12.21 inches of rain had been recorded. Total rainfall for those years was 61.30 inches and 51.57 inches, respectively. By the end of 2009, 63.20 inches of rainfall had been recorded, but only 9.72 inches had fallen by March 11 of that year.
The rainfall is actually going to be good for local farmers, according Obion County University of Tennessee Extension Service office director Tim Smith. Obion County saw low rainfall totals last year when only 37.92 inches of rain was recorded, with 7.20 inches falling by March 11.
Smith said the planting season is still a few weeks away, so the rain we’re getting now is good, as long as it doesn’t all come at the same time. Farm lands which are flooded are in the low areas and are prone to flooding this time of year, he said, adding a few wheat fields have been affected.
No major flooding problems have been reported here, according to Union City Police Chief Joe Garner and Obion County Sheriff Jerry Vastbinder.
Vastbinder said during heavy rains some of the low area roadways did have water over them.
For the first time in two years, the Union City ballfields at Graham Park were covered with water, but it quickly receded, according to turf management director Chris Crockett. He said the water was only over the fields for about four hours, but it left behind the worst debris he has seen in a while. As soon as the fields were cleared of the debris, they flooded again, but only for a short period of time. The water was also not as deep has it has been in the past.
Union City’s ballfields were once prone to flooding every time it came a hard rain, but Crockett said they have not had that problem since the public works department cleaned out the ditch.
Other areas of the nation have not been so fortunate.
Rising floodwater from the Ohio River caused two riverfront restaurants to close in Covington, Ky., on Wednesday, and classes to be canceled today at Riverview East Academy in the Cincinnati public school system. Cincinnati school officials said in a news release that the closing is the first due to river conditions at the school. The K-12 school opened in January 2006.
The National Weather Service said the river was nearly 2 feet above its official flood level this morning and was expected to rise 2 feet more by Friday evening.
Published in The Messenger 3.10.11

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