Reverse shoulder replacement surgery helps patients relieve pain

Reverse shoulder replacement surgery helps patients relieve pain

Posted: Wednesday, March 2, 2011 8:01 pm

For those individuals who have the effects of severe shoulder arthritis and irreparable torn rotator damage or a previous shoulder replacement that has failed, a reverse shoulder replacement could help them experience less pain and regain mobility for a better quality of life.
The Joint Replacement Center at Baptist Hospital has become a leader in shoulder replacement surgeries by caring for more patients with a focus on high-quality care.
Shoulder replacement surgeons at Baptist Hospital have studied with pioneers from leading-edge medical centers and developed instrumentation for surgery and rehabilitation protocols for patients undergoing shoulder replacement.
“Before reverse shoulder replacement was approved by the Federal Drug Administration in 2005, there were limited surgical options for patients with severe deterioration of the shoulder joint from the effects of arthritis and rotator cuff damage,” said Dr. Matthew Willis, an orthopedic surgeon at Baptist Hospital who is fellowship trained in disorders of the shoulder and elbow. “It’s very useful for many people who have endured pain and limited shoulder function and been told there’s not much else that can be done for them.”
In a normal shoulder, the ball-and-socket joint includes the upper arm bone, shoulder blade and collarbone supported by muscles, tendons and ligaments that control shoulder movement. The group of muscles and tendons that form the rotator cuff allow the arm to be lifted, reach overhead or create a throwing motion. This range of motion is severely restricted when patients have severe rotator cuff damage, causing the joint to become unstable. Over time, the unstable joint can wear down the cartilage between the bones, resulting in osteoarthritis.
A reverse shoulder replacement is unique because it goes against normal anatomy.
The ball and socket position are switched with the implant to increase stability. A new shoulder joint is created by an implant that is designed so the socket goes where the ball was and the ball where the socket was in order to re-establish the mechanical advantage to the remaining muscle.
The procedure is not recommended for all shoulder replacement patients because the range of motion is typically not on par with that of a conventional shoulder replacement.
Reverse shoulder replacement has changed the life of 62-year-old Rickie Puckett of Dickson, who suffered from arthritis and a series of torn rotator cuff injuries resulting in a rotator cuff that was too damaged to repair.
“My shoulder no longer hurts like it did before and I’m able to be active now. I’ve regained my strength. This procedure has really helped me relieve pain that I’ve had for several years,” said Puckett, who had reverse shoulder replacement at Baptist Hospital.
The Joint Replacement Center at Baptist Hospital includes a team of surgeons, orthopedic certified nurses, patient care technicians, case managers and physical therapists.
The center utilizes a team approach in the care of its patients – education to surgery to rehabilitation. Because of this approach, patients have a better understanding of their condition, restoration of mobility and improved quality of life.
For more information about reverse shoulder replacement or traditional shoulder replacement, call (615) 284-BONE or visit www.baptisthospital.com/orthopedics.
Baptist Hospital is a member of Saint Thomas Health Services, a faith-based ministry with more than 6,500 associates serving Middle Tennessee.

Published in The Messenger 3.2.11

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