Snow on the way, forecasters claim

Snow on the way, forecasters claim

Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:57 pm
By: AP, staff reports

From AP, staff reports
The white stuff is on its way.
Obion County and the surrounding area are under a winter weather advisory until 6 tonight, with snow and sleet accumulations expected to be between two and three inches. The chance of precipitation today is near 100 percent. Snow will continue into the early evening.
The prediction for bad weather lead Obion County School System officials to cancel school for today.
Today’s high is expected to be in the lower 30s, with temperatures dropping to between 10 and 15 tonight. The sun is supposed to make an appearance on Friday, but temperatures will only warm up into the mid-20s. It will get a little warmer on Saturday, with expected temperatures to get up in the lower 30s.
Snow is expected to fall again starting Sunday afternoon, when the chances are 20 percent for rain and snow. Chances will increase to 40 percent Sunday evening. There’s a chance of snow in the morning Monday, with a slight chance of snow that afternoon and flurries continuing into Tuesday.
The National Weather Service has put most of West Tennessee under a winter weather advisory from noon to 9 tonight. Forecasters say the front will move fast, beginning as a wintry mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain before becoming all snow. It looks like all snow for Middle Tennessee, beginning in the afternoon and bringing one to two inches. In East Tennessee, forecasters say rain will change to snow after midnight with the chance of light accumulations.
The snowy winter weather has been a boon to some Tennesseans.
The Ober-Gatlinburg ski resort has been very busy, reports The Knoxville News Sentinel.
Resort official Jerry Huskey says business this winter is stronger than last season, which was nearly a record year. Huskey says when schools and businesses close, many people looking for something to do come to Gatlinburg.
Hardware and home improvement stores say demand for winter supplies from snow shovels to sleds to salt has been strong.
Tom Hughes, president of O.G. Hughes and Sons Inc. in Knoxville, says his company has sold a lot of snowplows and salt spreaders. Much of that equipment went to entrepreneurs who bought it to go into the snow removal business.
Areas of Kentucky are expected to receive even more snow as the front pushes south. Weather forecasters are expecting Kentucky to be draped in snow by tonight, with as much as six inches in store for some areas. The weather service forecasts snow accumulations of two to three inches in western Kentucky.
Winter storm warnings were issued in advance of the storm, and those areas can expect significant snowfall, making travel dangerous.
The National Weather Service says temperatures in Kentucky should drop into the upper 20s after snow begins falling, eventually bottoming out in the lower 20s overnight.
Weather officials advise motorists who must travel to keep food, water and an extra flashlight in their vehicles in case of an emergency.
AAA offers the following tips for driving in the snow:
• Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
• Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning — nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
• The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to 10 seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
• Know your brakes. Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
• Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
• Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed down hill as slowly as possible.
• Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
• Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors.
Published in The Messenger 1.20.11

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