Only weather woe at lake is lack of rain

Only weather woe at lake is lack of rain

Posted: Friday, October 8, 2010 11:15 am

How about this weather?
Has it been great outside other than not having any rainfall.
Maybe, we’ll get some of the wet stuff soon.
While on the subject of weather, how many of you saw your first frost this past week?
We really came close to having our first freeze and some folks may have.
In terms of rain, we are 17 to 20 inches below normal on our yearly totals.  
If you have not taken a trip down to Reelfoot Lake to view the low waters, take your camera and head that way. The lake is low — really low. You will be amazed on how many stumps you see.
I have had several local folks tell me that the lake is easily as low now as it was in 2007 and 2008. Some folks along the lake are reporting that no water is under their dock or piers.
That is low folks.
It looks to me that you could lay a long 2×4 from stump to stump and almost walk across the lake.
But from several reports, the crappie bite is on and in a big way. Many folks are taking their chances, loading and unloading their boats and making their way to a favorite lake spot.
Most of the best bites are being caught in the Lower Blue Basin area of the lake. This is consistently the deepest spot on the lake.
The lake I have been told is at least 20 to 24 inches below normal level. Some duck hunters are traveling by four-wheeler to get to their hunting holes — which usually are holding water but are currently bone dry. You can even walk out of the Kirby Pocket area.
We can only hope and pray that the good Lord will be kind in blessing the Reelfoot Lake area and others for that matter with decent rains soon.
Crappie are being caught using minnows and jigs.
My mom, Patricia, and dad, Lanny went down to Reelfoot Lake on Wednesday to do some crappie fishing. They had a really good trip. Mom and Dad brought home 32 crappie.
Their largest was in the 11⁄2 pound size range. Mom said that she had never seen as many stumps and then the Asian carp started to move around them.
R.C. and Kenny Crews, a father and son duo, had a really good trip and caught several crappie at Reelfoot.
In other outdoors news, Tennessee’s deer archery hunters saw an increase in their harvest from a year ago. A total of 2,401 deer were taken — an increase of 163.
Of the total harvest, 776 deer were antlered, 1,504 were does, 101 buttons and 20 antlerless bucks.
The antlered deer bag limit is three this year.
A hunter may take his or her antlered deer during any season, but can harvest no more than one per day.
The  21st Annual Reelfoot Lake Waterfowl Festival and Sporting Collectibles Show will be held on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day in Samburg on the banks of Reelfoot Lake.
Call makers and collectors from all over the region and United States will settle in at the lake for the annual event.
The entry fee is for the duck calling contest at the Waterfowl Festival is $40.
For information on the calling contests, call Mike McLemore at 986-3090.  
Also, there is a duck and goose calling contest near Union City at Final Flight Outfitters on Saturday.
The competitions will begin at or around 9 a.m.  
This event is sponsored by Buck Gardner Game Calls. Registration begins at 8 am.
For more information, please contact Buck Gardner Calls at (901) 946-2996 or toll free (877) 245-9113.
Interested people can also contact the folks at Final Flight Outfitters by calling (866) 354-4489.
Also, don’t forget to vote “yes” on Nov. 2 for the Tennessee’s Right To Hunt and Fish Amendment.
I want to end this column by sharing a brief story about bad things that are happening on one Falcon Lake located in southern Texas near the U.S./Mexico border.
A good friend of mine named Debra Hengst, who is also a touring bass fishing professional, happens to guide on it from time to time.
A tourist visiting the lake from Colorado was reportedly shot and killed Sept. 30, while attempting to visit an old church on the Mexican side of the lake.
According to reports, the 30-year-old man and his wife were riding personal watercraft when three boats with armed pirates approached the pair.
A chase ensued as the couple fled for American water, but David Hartley was shot in the head and ultimately died.
His wife, Tiffany, tried to pull him onto her craft amid a shower of bullets but was forced to flee, leaving her husband in the water.
The pirates chased her back to American waters, but ended their pursuit as she reached shore and eventually dialed 911.
This is just one of many tragic incidents that has taken place on this famous lake in Texas.
To read a full story on this crime, do a search on the Internet.
It’s a sad situation. Seems like we aren’t safe anywhere these days.
Please remember to pass your outdoor information along to me so I can post it in my column for our readers to read.
’Til next week,
Catch ya on
the water folks,
Brent Callicott

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