Mrs. Carpenter appointed to state advisory board

Mrs. Carpenter appointed to state advisory board

Posted: Monday, October 4, 2010 11:31 am

Mary Carpenter, director of the Paul Meek Library at the University of Tennessee-Martin, has been appointed by Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett to a second term as a member of the Tennessee Advisory Council on Libraries.
Mrs. Carpenter formerly served as director of the Obion County Public Library.
She will serve as a representative for academic libraries on the council, which advises the Tennessee State Library and Archives in the development of short-term and long-term library programs, services and activities.
The council includes representatives from public, regional, school, academic and special libraries, as well as the Tennessee Library Association, Tenn-Share and library users.
“The Tennessee Advisory Council on Libraries plays an important role in advising the State Library and Archives. I am thankful we have dedicated people like Mary Carpenter who are willing to volunteer their time to serve on the council,” Hargett said. “Mrs. Carpenter’s service is instrumental in assisting State Library and Archives in supporting libraries throughout our state.”
“Having strong library supporters like Mary Carpenter on the council is important to us,” State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill said. “They have influence across our state. Council members inform us about library trends and needs in their spheres of interest and they help us design programs to meet library needs. They also take back and share information about services the state provides to help and guide local libraries.”
“I am absolutely delighted to be asked by Secretary Hargett to serve a second term on the Tennessee Advisory Council on Libraries,” Mrs. Carpenter said. “Serving with distinguished librarians and trustees from across our state — as well as our esteemed State Librarian Chuck Sherrill and Assistant State Librarian Jane Pinkston — is a distinct honor. The exposure to current library issues and trends is both informative and exciting. As our state experiences new challenges daily, the libraries of Tennessee have a rich opportunity to serve our citizens in many proactive and positive ways. The quiet, musty repository of books has now been replaced with a dynamic system with one foot placed firmly in the world of print and the other embracing technologies and programs of all sorts. The opportunity to be but a small part of this is truly humbling and deeply satisfying.”

Published in The Messenger 10.01.10

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