Lack of rainfall affecting fishing; waterfowl season could be hurt, too

Lack of rainfall affecting fishing; waterfowl season could be hurt, too

Posted: Friday, September 3, 2010 1:08 pm
By: By Brent Callicott

Lack of rainfall affecting fishing; waterfowl season could be hurt, too | Brent Callicott

Johnny Garrett, 10 pound, 8 ounce
Lack of rainfall continues to contribute to the low water levels at Reelfoot Lake.
This is not good with fall fishing almost here and the winter waterfowl season just a few months away. We need rain for everything, including our area ponds, rivers and lakes.
The water level at Reelfoot is now some 15-plus inches below the normal level. Evaporation rates continue each day but with the really hot weather almost behind us, this should help just a bit.
Just since Aug. 24, Reelfoot has dropped another two inches. Not Good!
With the fall season coming, that should mean more moist air that will settle into our part of the country if things follow normal averages.
Not much in the way of fishing reports to pass along to you but lots of duck blind building going on around the lake as I understand it.
The crappie bite has been picking up some from the reports this week.
On Monday, my dad (Lanny) and I had a the opportunity to go wet a hook together bass fishing. This was dad’s first trip bass fishing in several years, but he has not lost his touch.
We spent several hours on a West Tennessee lake enjoying fellowship, food, fishing and some pictures along the way.
We managed to boat several bass that day, in the neighborhood of 30. Our best being in the 5 pound range.
No matter if the fish had been biting or not, we simply just had a great time.
Then, while fishing that day, we received a call from our good friend Johnny Garrett, who called to tell us about his trophy size bass he caught last Saturday also on an area lake. We had nothing to compare to the 10 pound, 8 ounce bass he landed while also fishing with his grandson, John Coble Garrett.
The memories made on those two trips between me and my dad and Johnny and John are things no one can take away from us. The time shared like this is time well spent. Trust me, 40-plus years later, Dad and I are still doing it every now and then.
So the next time you head out fishing, hunting, to a sporting event or just a family outing, simply take your camera and take pictures. They are priceless and will be enjoyed for years to come.
A reminder that our friends down at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Reelfoot Lake are still asking for the public’s help.
The Friends of West Tennessee National Wildlife Refuges are requesting native North American waterfowl mount donations for the the West Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge Complex to use during educational programs. These waterfowl mounts will be used strictly for student career fairs, local events such as National Wildlife Refuge week to teach waterfowl identification, a variety of school programs and mostly for the Jr. Duck Stamp program. The Jr. Duck Stamp Program introduces youth grades K-12 to the world of waterfowl. Students combine science with art to learn about native north American waterfowl and their habitats.
The Friends of West Tennessee National Wild-life Refuges requests that donated waterfowl mounts be anywhere from fair to excellent condition. For more information, please contact Tara Dowdy at the Reelfoot National Wildlife Refuge, 4343 Highway 157, Union City, 731-538-2481 or e-mail Tara at Tara_Dowdy@fws.gov .
The 2010-11 Dove season is in full swing after Wednesday’s opening day hunt. I just want to remind everyone there are three dove seasons split into segments. The dates of each segment are as follows: Sept. 1-26, Oct. 9-24 and Dec.19-Jan. 15, 2011.
The third segment is overlooked by many and is usually the best. Large concentration of doves will gather with limited food supply at that time. Also, gaining permission to hunt on someone’s land could play out to be a great winter time outdoor outing.
With the fall hunting season fast approaching, the Environmental Protection Agency, under Lisa Jackson, who was responsible for banning bear hunting in New Jersey, is now considering a petition by the Center for Biological Diversity — a leading anti-hunting organization — to ban all traditional ammunition under the Toxic Substance Control Act of 1976, a law in which Congress expressly exempted ammunition. If the EPA approves the petition, the result will be a total ban on all ammunition containing lead-core components, including hunting and target-shooting rounds. The EPA must decide to accept or reject this petition by Nov. 1, the day before the mid-term elections.
Then on Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has rejected the petition submitted by Michael Fry of the American Bird Conservancy to ban lead in outdoor sports, namely ammunition and fishing tackle. The rejection addresses jurisdictional issues over the agency’s legal authority to issue such a ban under the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976.
This petition was filed in early August, but is just one of many the EPA has received related to lead in fishing and hunting equipment.
This was a win for all hunters, however, fishermen are not in the clear yet with the second part of the petition still under review by the EPA. According to the EPA, there are no jurisdictional issues with the agency’s authority over fishing sinkers, however, so they are still reviewing the petition in terms of that side of the argument.
To read the full release from the EPA, visit the epa.gov website.
The EPA will consider comments made by Sept. 15 on this petition and issue.
The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Fisheries Division has announced its proposed 2011 fishing regulation changes that will be presented to the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Commission at its October meeting.
The TWRA made its initial proposals for 2011 at the August meeting of the TWRC that was held in Jackson Aug. 18-19.
The following are TWRA’s proposed changes in our region (Region 1): Gibson County Lake and Brown’s Creek Lake: Change slot limit on largemouth bass to an 18-24 inch protected length range (slot limit). Only one bass in creel of 5 fish may be over 24 inches.
For a complete listing of proposed rule changes, go to the TWRA website at www.tnwildlife.org
That’s all for this week’s report.
Send your photos or your outdoors information to me at brentcallicott@gmail.com.
Also, if you have any questions, please feel free to contact me by phone at 446-3678.
’til next week…
Catch ya on
the water folks.
Brent
Published in The Messenger 9.3.10

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