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Animal shelter concerns raised; council working on new location

Animal shelter concerns raised; council working on new location

Posted: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 9:03 pm
By: Donna Ryder, Associate Editor

By DONNA RYDER
Associate Editor
The City of Union City is working to move the animal shelter in the city to an existing building.
This was information which was shared by Mayor Terry Hailey and interim city manager Kathy Dillon Tuesday night at the Union City Council meeting.
Roger Kimmel, who has appeared before the council in the past about Ann’s Place, asked the council Tuesday night what the city plans to do with the shelter.
He said the shelter has been doing pretty well and that shelter manager Sarah Dodd has been doing a good job.
“I’ve been keeping an eye on things,” he said.
Hailey said plans are to move the shelter to a facility on North Fifth Street. “It hasn’t been done yet, but those are our plans.”
Ms. Dillon said three different companies are looking at the building and giving price estimates for renovating it. She said once the city knows the cost, they will be able to place the item in the budget.
Kimmel said he appreciates what the city is doing, but he would like to see the animals out of the heat.
He said Ms. Dodd is doing her best with the sick puppies which come into the shelter. “You will lose puppies from parvo (parvovirus),” he said.
The Union City Police Department received a call around 2:40 p.m. Sunday about a dog having a possible seizure outside the fence at the shelter, but when police arrived they could find no animal in distress outside the fenced area. After further investigation, the report noted an animal was found to be dead in a pen inside the ence and then a second dog was found dead inside the trailer in a cage. Shelter officials told police both animals had been sick.
The report also stated that most of the dogs had no water or food and that temperatures were around 94 degrees, with a heat index of around 104. Shelter officials said a volunteer had been there at 1:15 p.m. and had fed and watered all animals and that the dogs constantly turn over their food and water bowls. It was also noted that volunteers check on the animals every two hours.
“The humane society is a good thing,” Kimmel told the council. “They try to get (the animals) homes. They’ve showed me good things.”
In other business, the council:
• Received three names for consideration for appointment to a vacant seat on the Planning Commission. Names mentioned by Ms. Dillon included John Miles, Clay Parker and Dr. Mark Fowler. Councilman Bill “Rat” Harrison placed Miles’ name on the floor, while councilman Johnny Bacon placed Parker’s name on the floor. Miles was appointed by a vote of four to three.
• Awarded an annual contract to Eaves Tree Service upon recommendation of Public Works director Steve Ladd.
• Approved school board budget amendments, the bulk of which included federal projects.
• Approved the 2010-11 school budget. It includes significantly increased retirement rates, a 5 percent increase for medical insurance (though it may not be needed, according to Director of Schools Gary Houston) and $64,000 for school resource officers. Several of the capital outlay projects mentioned by Houston include new bleachers in the high school, resurfacing the track, replacing a cooling tower at the middle school and a lighting project at the middle and high schools. He said the lower bleachers are original to the building, which opened in 1972, and the track surface is 13 years old. He added much of the light project is being paid for through a grant.
• Agreed to solicit bids for the demolition of buildings at 5220 North Home St. and 460 Harrison St.
• Authorized the purchase of four hand-held meter reader devices and associated equipment from United Systems for $16,962. Harrison said he wants to know the total cost of having the city’s water meters read. He said there has to be a more economical way to read meters.
• Appointed Joanne Killion and Martha Rippy to City Beautiful Commission and reappointed Lee Fry to the Electric Power Board and Mike Ervin to the Obion County Industrial Development Corp. board of directors.
• Approved the closure of Church Street in front of Kiwanis Park on July 17 from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. for First United Pentecostal Church. The event organizers have submitted all the proper paperwork, including proof of special events insurance.
The board also approved the closure of Ford Street from Nailling Drive to the first driveway of Ford Street Apartments on Saturday for Dots for Tots, contingent on organizers providing the proof of special events insurance.
Ms. Dillon said the insurance is a requirement for everyone who wishes to use city property.
• Received a tax update.
• Heard from Harrison that he had read in the newspaper that Hope of Martin had placed an advertisement concerning property on Home and Clover streets. The organization has taken over ownership of property which had been owned by Obion County after a tax sale and was not being properly cared for.
Associate Editor Donna Ryder can be contacted by e-mail at dryder@ucmessenger.com.
Published in The Messenger 6.23.10

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