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Dresden Duplicate Club 6-3

Dresden Duplicate Club 6-3

Posted: Friday, June 4, 2010 3:54 pm
By: Toni Pritchett

Press 6/3 – Dresden Duplicate Bridge Club had two games the week of May 24.  The Tuesday Night Club met and had a most enjoyable game of bridge.  Three tables were in play, and Alma Ford and Sarah Pentecost were hostesses. They served piemento cheese sandwiches, BLT dip with chips, and a cream cheese dip for a fresh vegetable tray of cherry tomatoes, sliced squash, cucumbers, carrotts, broccoli and caulilower.  The dessert they served were those delicious “Putting On The Ritz” cookies.
     Winners were-1st Linda Jennings and Becky Bennett and 2nd-Jane Young and Sandra Klutts. Tied for 3rd place were Bertha Henry and Reba Nell Brasfield and Alma Ford and Sarah  Pentecost.
Wednesday’s Club met with five tables in play. Lots of entusiasm was evident  in the game.  Sarah Pentecost was back and Tom Beard was glad.  She had missed two weeks because she went to help flood victims in Selmer.  Sarah and her husband, Mike Pentecost, go often to these events where help is needed. There is always a challenge there for all these helpers who give their time and love and energy to the disaster victims.    
Sarah brought some of the left overs from Tuesday’s game.  She had a new dip with all those vegetables, spinach dip along with chocolate cookies and a bowl full of watermellon bites, pepper jack cheese slices and more “Putting On The Ritz”.
The winners of Wednesday’s game were Flight A-Freddye Oliver and Toni Pritchett and Jo Glasgow and Peggy Mayo.  Flight B winners were Dot Beach, and Bertha Henry, and Tom Beard and Sarah Pentecost.
More news about a former First Lady and our First President of The United States.
The Revolutionary War had really put George Washington in serious financial straits, and accepting the  highest office in the land, a responsibility he was somewhat loath to assume, was the answer to his money troubles.  He soon proved just how big a spender a chief could be.  His salary was $25,000 equivalent to about a million dollars today. Seven percent of his salary was spent on alcohol.  He even splurged on such luxuries as leopardskin robes for his stable of matched horses.
     George Washing-ton  married a widow Martha Custis in 1759. Martha Dandridge had first married Daniel Parke Custis, a prominent planter of more than 17,000 acres and a bank account.  She had four children with him, two to survive childhood.  He died leaving her the weathiest marriageable woman in Virginia.  She and George married in 1758 and appeared to have a great marriage, untroubled by infidelity or clash of temperament.  George Washington adopted her two sons, and they had no other children
   Even after Martha Washington’s father-in-law, John Custis IV died, she continued to be haunted by the legacy of his will.  John Custis IV stipulated in his will that his illegitimate son by a slave-woman, “Mulatto Jack,” be freed and inherit a handsome portion of his estate and fortune.  According to the laws at the time, however Mulatto Jack could not be freed.  This was impossible to fulfill.  The young Washingtons would need to spend a fortune on drawn-out legal battles.  The solution arrived in September 1751 with Jack’s death.  It neatly solved the issue of the inheritance.  Jack was young and, by all accounts, healthy.  Did Martha and an accomplice actually  kill the poor fellow?  We’ll never know.

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