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Huss passes exam, admitted to bar

Huss passes exam, admitted to bar

Posted: Friday, May 14, 2010 8:58 pm

By CHRIS MENEES
Staff Reporter
Law school is officially behind Obion County Director of Schools David Huss and now he’s just “practicing” what he learned.
Huss — who earned a doctor of jurisprudence in 2009 — recently passed the bar exam and was officially admitted to the bar.
However, he said he has no plans to practice law on a full-time basis in the near future.
“I have made a commitment to the Obion County School System and intend on honoring that commitment,” he said. “This is an absolutely wonderful school system and I think we’re only getting better. Right now, as long as I feel like I’m contributing to the success of the school system, I would like to stay for as long as the board will allow me to stay.”
Huss said his law degree will actually benefit him on a daily basis in his capacity as Obion County’s director of schools since he frequently must deal with issues regarding laws, rules and regulations, federal statutes and board policy.
“There’s no doubt it will come in handy,” he said.
He said he can recall at least two other directors of school that he knew in the past who had law degrees, but neither of them passed the bar exam.
Huss earned a bachelor of science degree in accounting in 1989 from the University of Tennessee at Martin and a master’s degree in educational leadership in 2001 from Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville. He finished his studies at the Nashville School of Law in 2009 to earn the doctor of jurisprudence.
He explained he completed law school on a five-year plan, attending on a full-time basis for two years when he lived in Nashville and then cutting back to part-time due to the long commute when he came to Union City in 2006 to serve as Obion County’s director of schools. The last two years of study were spread out over three years.
Huss said after passing the bar exam, he had two options for being admitted to the bar to practice law. He could either go before the Supreme Court in Nashville or could do it locally, due to a rule that went into effect last year. For the sake of convenience, he chose to be admitted to the bar locally — with the brief ceremony recently held in Obion County General Sessions Court.
He chose Obion County General Sessions Judge Jimmy Smith — an attorney who formerly served as vice chairman of the Obion County School Board — to administer the oath. He also had to have two attorneys recommend him for admission to the bar and he chose local attorneys John Miles and Jim Glasgow Jr., both of whom he had worked with on a professional level in the past.
“What John and Jim had to do was recommend me for admission to the bar and Jimmy administered the oath,” Huss said. “They graciously did that for me.”
Staff Reporter Chris Menees may be contacted by e-mail at cmenees@ucmessenger.com.
Published in The Messenger 5.14.10

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