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Tulip Grove Chapter holds Christmas meeting

Tulip Grove Chapter holds Christmas meeting

Posted: Wednesday, December 23, 2009 1:47 pm

Tulip Grove Chapter United States Daughters of 1812 met Dec. 2, 2009, at the Jackson County Club for the yearly Christmas meeting. Chapter President Regina East decorated the tables with red poinsettias that made the room festive for the season.
East called the meeting to order and welcomed everyone. Chapter Chaplain Joy Bland read I John 3:18, which says, “My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed in truth.” Love God’s people, and do something for someone this holiday season.
Chapter Historian and State Librarian Donna Cooley led the patriotic exercises for the Salute to the American Flag, Salute to the 1812 Flag and Salute to the Tennessee Flag. Joan Harmon led the American’s Creed. JoAnn Birmingham read the Purposes of the National Society.
Barbara Stegall gave the National Defense report on the importance of the person’s running in the 8th District for John Tanner’s seat. She also reported on the $1 million facelift on the home of Andrew Jackson, the Hermitage, built in 1819. It has been about 30 or 40 years since the building’s exterior was repaired. Workers are replacing rotting beams, damage of boards by water, insects and tornado. They will be working to seal the building so that all their hard work doesn’t have to be repeated 40 years down the road.
Cooley gave the flag facts. She remarked that a American flag is always placed in a voting precinct, and always fly your flag on proper holidays.
The Recording Secretary was absent because of her husband’s illness.
Treasurer Aline Roberts gave the financial report. Everyone donated $5 to help build up the account for next year’s projects.
Under old business, members brought items for the Humboldt Veteran Home. East asked members to get their chapter officer of chapter chairmanship report to her by Jan. 15. East also said anyone can still order their 1812 insignia before Christmas.
Roberts gave the program, “Christmas and the War of 1812,” by Harold W. Youomans. Christmas was not a popular feast day in the United States in the early 19th century. The Puritans in colonial Boston had, for a time, outlawed the celebrations that were not strictly spiritual. However, Christmas day was freely observed in Virginia and New York. Christmas generally fell from favor in this nation after the American Revolution.
During the War of 1812, contemporary commentators reflected this overall trend. Irish journalist John Binns, editor of the Philadelphia Democratic Press, reported the nature of the holiday in Pennsylvania. On December 1810, his paper noted the lack of interest not only in Christmas but also other holidays.
Binns was a powerful voice in the Democratic Party until he opposed Andrew Jackson’s run for the presidency in 1823. After that time, he had to content himself with a relatively low Alderman’s post in Philadelphia.
Charles Mowry, editor of the American Republican, was not above striking hard at his opponents during the war. On Dec. 29, 1812, as Pennsylvania militia regiments froze and died along the Niagara River in Upper Canada, his paper noted that “the poor soldier gets on 30 cents a day in the field for having bayonets poked through his ribs and sides bored with bullets, while his brother legislators draw three dollars a day for eating Christmas pies.” And you thought class warfare was a modern American invention.
America knew nothing of peace that Christmas. On Dec. 18, 1814, eight American soldiers and sailors died. Isaac Anderson, Abraham Barber and Henry Burbage died on Christmas Day at Dartmoor Prison in England. On Dec. 25, 1814, Peter Deckar, Samuel Hugh, Francis Lendman, Benjamin Norris and Joel Smith died on the battlefield or in camp of the war.
To these men, Christmas was just another day. No, it was their last day of war. Let us remember our service men and women serving for our freedom.
East treated everyone to a tasty luncheon. Gifts were exchanged and everyone enjoyed singing Christmas carols.

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