Try Goodwill for low cost costumes

Try Goodwill for low cost costumes

Posted: Monday, October 13, 2008 9:06 pm

Browsing through a costume shop for the perfect Halloween getup, customers can find risque rabbit outfits and scary movie spoofs.
But, that all comes with a hefty price tag. If the cost, usually upwards of $60, makes you choke on your candy corn, try shopping for your Halloween costume at a Goodwill store.
With many consumers outfitting themselves on tighter budget as the U.S. economy continues to weaken, many parents, students and partygoers are looking to pinch pennies, dimes and dollars when possible.
This year alone, Goodwill has seen a 12 percent increase in store sales compared to last year during the same timeframe. “Shopping at Goodwill for your costume or regular clothing needs is a great way to save extra money and give back to a charity,” said David Lifsey, president and CEO for Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee.
The organization began placing Halloween costumes on the sales floor in mid-September. The costumes, gently-used, usually run in the ballpark of $20. Compare that to the specialty costume shop prices.
Or, if buying a bagged costume isn’t your style, create a classic costume for less than $20 when you shop savvy with a little imagination in mind. Most separate pieces run around $3.99 to $7.49 for adults and less for children.
You can assemble your own Halloween costume by getting a game plan together.
When shopping for that one-of-a-kind costume, Goodwill has clothing color-coordinated and sized, which should speed up the process of finding your duds.
Shop smart and create a personal take on a classic costume.
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For over 50 years, Goodwill has provided job training and job placement free of charge to people with disabilities or other barriers to employment through the sale of donated items. In 2007, Goodwill served 7,480 people and placed 2,319 in jobs in the community. For more information on Goodwill’s Career Solutions, retail stores, and donation centers, visit giveit2goodwill.org or call 1 (800) 545-9231.
Published in The Messenger 10.13.08

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