Skip to content

Oncology on Canvas project scheduled for Union City stop

Oncology on Canvas project scheduled for Union City stop

Posted: Thursday, August 14, 2008 11:25 pm
By: Glenda H. Caudle Special Features Editor

By GLENDA H. CAUDLE Special Features Editor Emotion must find an outlet. For some who have experienced the overwhelming emotion tied to a diagnosis of cancer for themselves or a loved one, the outlet has been art — imagining it, creating it, viewing it, recalling it. In 2004 and again in 2006, Eli Lilly and Company sponsored the Lilly Oncology on Canvas project and invited people from all over the world to “put their feelings about cancer on canvas and in narrative.” In 2006, the invitation resulted in 2,151 pieces of art from 43 countries in the categories of oil, watercolor, acrylic, photography, pastel and “other,” which included any additional type of one-dimensional, mixed media offerings. Artists’ entries from the U.S. and Puerto Rico numbered 492 in the world competition. The majority of the U.S. entries came from people diagnosed with cancer (55 percent); family members, friends and caregivers (29 percent); health care providers (9 percent); and artists/art students (7 percent). Entries were reviewed by a global panel of independent judges who based their choices on the artwork and accompanying narratives that best portrayed the meaning of the cancer journey. Winners of the U.S. competition were officially announced at the Lilly Oncology on Canvas U.S. finale at The Level — Metropolitan Pavilion in New York Dec. 5, 2006. Each winner received a sum of money donated to a cancer charity they chose. The first place U.S. winner, Anne Wilson of Morganton, N.C., was awarded a $10,000 donation to her cancer charity choice and an all-expense paid trip to New York for two to attend the finale. The second-place winner was able to forward $5,000 to the cancer charity she selected and the third-place winner became a donor to the tune of $2,500 for her cancer charity. Ms. Wilson’s winning photograph was titled “This Is Not the Dress Rehearsal.” Her award went to the University of North Carolina Lindberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill. “Our precious daughter felt strongly about these words from an early age,” her parents said. “It was as if she knew something the rest of us did not know. When she was diagnosed at age 23 with small cell lung cancer, she continued to remember these words.” Area residents will be able to view much of the emotion embodied in artistic works at an upcoming showing at Family Cancer Center at 1012 South Miles Ave. in Union City Aug. 25 from 2-4 p.m. Dr. Margaret Gore, oncology and hematology specialist, is inviting not only cancer patients and their families but all who would like to view the work to visit. “This program was conceived by Eli Lilly and Company as a way to honor the journey of those whose lives have been affected by cancer. The rich tapestry of emotions conveyed in these pieces of art endures and provides hope and inspiration to others,” a spokesman said. “We believe that all those diagnosed with cancer are survivors from the moment of diagnosis, and where there is life, there is hope. Lilly Oncology on Canvas embodies this spirit,” according to Ellen Stovall. She is a two-time cancer survivor of 34 years and is president and CEO of National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, a partner with Eli Lilly and Company in the project. For more information about the art showing, call the Family Cancer Center at 884-1412. Published in The Messenger 8.14.08