Miss Shultz, Alexander united in marriage

Miss Shultz, Alexander united in marriage

Posted: Wednesday, July 9, 2008 7:39 pm

The grounds of the historic Lowndes Grove Plantation in Charleston, S.C., were the setting for the recent wedding of Ansley Ames Shultz and Tyler Caldwell Alexander, both of Atlanta. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Steven Shultz Sr. of Fort Pierce, Fla. Her grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. William N. Shultz of Fort Pierce and the late Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Guest of Peachtree City, Ga. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Dean Alexander of Union City. He is the grandson of Mrs. David Brown Walker of Hendersonville and the late William L. Caldwell and the late Mr. and Mrs. Leslie H. Alexander of Union City. Guests arrived by shuttles through the plantation gates. The plantation home, circa 1786, is located on 14 stunning acres on the banks of the Ashley River. The only surviving plantation on Charleston’s downtown peninsula, it is known as the premier Charleston wedding venue. Guests entering this private and peaceful setting were seated on the front lawn with the exquisite antebellum home and its five gothic revival arches as the backdrop for this ceremony. The altar was flanked with tall copper pots filled with blooming branches of corkscrew willow, viburnum and white cherry and collar of pale green hydrangeas, astilbe and coral French tulips at the base. The aisle was lined with pale green hydrangea-filled copper pots, which hung gracefully from mango-colored satin ribbons. Ushers escorting guests to their seats were Douglas Beachum of Charleston, Mark Beachum of Aiken, S.C., Dr. Jason Cameron of Knoxville, Dr. Will Crook of Stuart, Fla., Clint Joiner of Union City and Steven Shultz, the bride’s brother, of Jensen Beach, Fla. An a cappella singing group presented a program of celebratory music, including “More Love to Thee,” “Amazing Grace” and “Sweet, Sweet Spirit.” A choral prelude was presented by Ghadi Shayban, keyboardist, and Chuck Dalton, trumpeter, both of Charleston. The bride’s grandmother and the mothers of the bride and groom were seated during the playing of “Hornpipe” by Handel. The bride’s grandmother was seated by Will Crook, her grandson-in-law. She wore a dramatic full-length black column dress with a scoop neck. This was topped with a sheer jacket, featuring striated long sleeves and chiffon ruffling around the neck and lapel. Mothers of the couple were escorted by their respective sons, Steven Shultz and Ryan Alexander of Atlanta. The bride presented each mother with a monogrammed and dated heirloom handkerchief, which belonged to her late maternal grandmother. The bride’s mother wore an original Rose Taft. The navy off-the-shoulder silk satin gown featured a sweetheart neckline, ruched bodice and full-length A-line skirt. Mrs. Alexander chose a mocha floor-length gown by Andrianna Papell. The two-piece silk shantung gown featured a beaded and sequin embellished bodice attached to a full skirt. The same beaded embellishments adorned the sleeves of the matching three-quarter-length bolero jacket. “Ode to Joy” by Beethoven heralded the appearance of the groom and minister, then turned the guests’ attention to the entrance of the matron of honor Kimberly Crook, sister of the bride, of Stuart, escorted by the best man Ryan Alexander. Mrs. Crook wore a floor-length mango dupioni silk strapless A-line dress accented with a celery dupioni silk sash. She carried a hand-tied bouquet of coral peonies, mango parrot tulips and pale green viburnum and cymbidium orchids wrapped with celery green satin ribbon to match the sash of the dress. Ryan Alexander and all male members of the wedding party wore traditional black single-breasted tuxedos. They were given antique 19th century Indianhead pennies encased in sterling silver cufflinks designed by the groom. They wore boutonnieres of clustered white astilbe and parrot tulips. Flower girl Sally Jane Lloyd of Fort Pierce and ring bearer Cade Crook, nephew of the bride, of Stuart preceded the bride’s entrance. Miss Lloyd wore a tea-length ivory dupioni silk frock featuring a full skirt. The dress was accented with a celery monogram and sash. Her hair was adorned with a wreath of mini green cymbidium orchids and she carried a green reindeer moss covered basket containing mango colored rose petals. The ring bearer was dressed in a traditional black tuxedo and carried a handmade ring pillow created from another heirloom handkerchief belonging to the bride’s grandmother. The bride and her father emerged from a black London taxicab at the back of the tent. As a trumpet fanfare announced their arrival, guests rose to acknowledge her presence and Shultz began to escort his daughter down the aisle to “Trumpet Tune” by Purcell. The radiant bride was presented to her waiting groom. She was adorned in an original Anne Barge Atelier, handmade of ivory Italian silk taffeta. The gown was strapless with pin-tuck pleats around the bodice. It fell into a dropped waist with yet another panel of delicate pin-tuck pleats. Her flowing skirt gracefully swept the grass. A tiny row of taffeta covered buttons accented the back of the gown and a wispy veil tucked into a modern chignon at the nape of her neck cascaded down to her waist. A single gardenia was placed on the left side of her hair. She carried a simple hand-tied bouquet of white peonies, astilbe and parrot tulips accented with gardenia, pale green viburnum and cymbidium orchids. The stems were wrapped in ivory satin ribbon to which the wedding bands of the bride’s mother, grandmother and great-grandmother were entwined. The Rev. Christopher Barrett of Charleston delivered the homily and officiated the double-ring ceremony. Although an unexpected, brief squall sent guests shuffling towards the middle of the tent, the happy couple exchanged vows and rings and were presented as husband and wife. The crowd applauded and the majestic sounds of “Oh Happy Day” by Hawkins, as provided by the a cappella singers, signified the momentous ceremony was complete. RECEPTION Parents of the bride invited guests to join the family through the plantation’s piazza into the tented reception overlooking the Ashley River to celebrate the joyous occasion. Oversized round coral and celery green paper lanterns and hundreds of tiny white lights hung effortlessly from the ceiling, illuminating the party, and set the mood for the wonderful evening to come. The reception area was dotted with round tables draped with mango and celery satin cloths, each topped with a copper urn of pale green hydrangeas, coral peonies and French tulips. The room was centered around the elegant wedding cake. The three-tiered confection was iced with ivory buttercream and coral fondant ribbon bands and had two half-layers, with green buttercream icing in between. Topped with a blossom of hydrangea, it was filled with alternating layers of fresh raspberry cream and chocolate ganache with raspberries. Upon entering the reception, guests were served an assortment of hand-passed southern delicacies, including baby fried green tomatoes, pimento cheese canapés, Low Country crab cakes and ham and Gouda sweet potato biscuits. The a cappella group provided the entertainment. The couple arrived at the reception after taking photographs on the Ashley River. Once they were announced, the bride’s father toasted them. The cake-cutting immediately followed and the couple was serenaded as they danced their first dance to Solomon Burke’s “Nobody But You.” Guests were invited to the chef-manned stations throughout the tent, where they served roast baron of beef with horseradish, salsa and fresh rolls; a Low Country favorite of shrimp with grits and chorizo gravy; cheese tortellini and penne pasta; and southern fried chicken with red eye gravy and fried okra. After an evening of celebration and dancing, including special guest keyboardist Roger Alexander, the bride and groom headed off into the moonlight through an archway of lighted sparklers. They were chauffeured away in a classic, red and white 1958 Ford Fairlane Skyliner convertible with Obion County roots. Owner and driver Gerald Beachum, uncle of the groom, now of Lugoff, S.C., transported the couple to The Charleston Place Hotel. After honeymooning on the beaches of Rio de Janeiro and Jericoacaora, Brazil, the couple now resides in Atlanta. REHEARSAL DINNER On the eve of the wedding, the parents of the groom hosted a festive Low Country rehearsal dinner at historic Gage Hall, located in downtown Charleston. The round tables for guests dotted throughout the banquet hall were draped in white floor-length linen with red gingham overlays. The tables were centered with wooden boxes which held blue hydrangeas, butter yellow spray roses, white astilbe, white clematis and butter yellow tulips. Mixtures of fresh herbs and fern were intermingled in the arrangements. Surrounding the flowers were frosted votives. Tall cocktail tables draped in floor-length red linen with white ties around the centers were interspersed throughout the hall. Simple bud vases filled with single stems of blue hydrangea and butter yellow tulips were placed atop each table. The buffet tables were draped in white floor-length linen with red gingham overlays. On each end table, tall wooden vases were filled with curly willow with blue hydrangeas, white astilbe and butter yellow spray roses placed around the base, creating a collar of color. Bud vases of flowers and white frosted votives were dotted throughout the serving pieces. After the groom’s father blessed the meal, guests enjoyed delicious Low Country fare catered by Charleston restaurateur and long time friend Aaron Siegel of Home Team BBQ. The menu consisted of refined Low Country boil, beef brisket, collards, macaroni and cheese and green salad. Following the meal, the groom’s parents showed a video of the bridal couple, sharing many memorable moments from their infancy through their engagement. The groom’s father presented the first toast of the evening, with the bride’s father following. More toasts and humorous stories by friends and family followed, highlighted by poems written by the bride’s sister, Mrs. Crook, and longtime friend, Sara Lloyd of Fort Pierce, Fla. Following the dinner, the groom’s parents hosted a post-rehearsal dessert and beverage social. Guests enjoyed banana pudding and mixed fruit cobbler topped with vanilla ice cream. The groom’s long time friend, Cameron Williams, vocalist and guitarist, of Tishamingo, provided musical entertainment for the evening. The highlight of the evening was the groom’s father accompanying Williams on the piano with several blues and old rock’n’ roll favorites. Published in The Messenger 7.9.08

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