Hot start to June and it’s not even summer

Hot start to June and it’s not even summer

By: AP, staff reports

From AP, staff reports NASHVILLE — Summer doesn’t arrive for two more weeks, but that’s by the calendar, not the thermometer. The first eight days of June were hot across much of the state and record highs were set in northeastern Tennessee. The National Weather Service said Monday that Nashville’s first eight days of June were the hottest such span in 60 years. West Tennessee largely escaped the unusual heat, but forecaster Marlene Mickelson in Memphis said the past few nights were warmer than usual, with the wind staying up and bringing in warm air. In Union City, high temperatures have reached into the 90s the last four days in a row. The stretch of hot, humid weather began Friday with a recorded high of 92 degrees, followed by 93 degrees both Saturday and Sunday and a high of 92 on Monday. Lows stayed in the mid-70s several nights last week but dipped to the upper 60s Monday night after rain swept through Obion County. Local temperatures are forecast to be more mild today, with highs only in the upper 80s. Forecaster Bobby Boyd at the Nashville NWS office said temperatures in the 90s put the average high temperature in the capital city 8 degrees above normal from June 1 through June 8. The Tri-Cities broke the record high of 95 degrees on June 6 by 1 degree and tied a 93-degree record June 4. The high temperature Sunday tied a record of 94 degrees. Oak Ridge set new highs of 94 on consecutive days last week. It was hot in Knoxville and Chattanooga, too, but meteorologist Mike Propst said Oak Ridge weather records date only to the 1940s and Bristol records to the 1930s. Knoxville and Chattanooga data goes back into the 1800s. Knoxville topped out at 93 on Sunday and Chattanooga hit 94 degrees. Both had 1933 records of 100 degrees for the date. The chance of showers and thunderstorms, beginning today, will slightly lower expected highs into the upper 80s in the east to around 90 in the west. Summer officially arrives with the solstice at 6:59 p.m. June 20. In addition to the warm temperatures, the Tri-Cities area of northeastern Tennessee was under an air quality alert Monday after the Environment and Conservation Department said ozone concentration could approach or exceed unhealthy levels. The code orange alert cautioned that very young people, elderly people and those with compromised immune systems could be affected. Published in The Messenger 6.10.08

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