TBI warns of bank scam via e-mail

TBI warns of bank scam via e-mail

Special agent John Mehr of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation puts a late e-mail appeal from a London “banker” in proper perspective. “I have a very simple answer for what it is. It is a scam,” he said. He wants the story told, saying it would benefit the public because “so many people are buying into the scam and getting taken.” E-mails such as this go everywhere, Mehr added, “some in letter form, some by FAX and e-mail.” But beware, Mehr warns. The wolf is at the door. “They want your banking information so they can clean out your account and get your information so they can open you some new accounts, including credit cards,” he said. “They will destroy your credit rating.” Here’s what happened: A Union City man received an unsolicited e-mail from a man in London who identifies himself as Dr. John Briggs, regional bank manager of HSBC Bank, Green Woods High Street Branch. His e-mail begins with an innocent approach. “I came to know you in my private search for a reliable and reputable person to handle this confidential transaction. I have packaged a financial transaction that will benefit both of us.” Briggs — if that is his real name — goes on to say he has discovered the bank made an excess profit of seven million pounds “which my head office are not aware of and will never be aware of.” He states he has placed it in a suspense account that has no beneficiary. “As an officer of the bank I cannot be directly connected to this money. This is why I’m contacting you for us to work so that you can assist and receive this money into your bank account for us to share,” he writes. “I will offer you 20 percent of the total amount of your assistance. “Note that there are practically no risks involved in this transaction. It will be bank to bank transfer. All I need from you is to stand claim as the original depositor who made the deposit with my branch so that my head office can order the transfer to your designated bank account. “Do not make undue the advantage of the trust I have bestowed on you. I assure you we can achieve it successfully. I wait soon to hear from you.” As the saying goes: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Published in The Messenger 6.5.08

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