Troy mayor lauds results of Sharefest

Troy mayor lauds results of Sharefest

By: Donna Ryder Messenger Associate Editor

By DONNA RYDER
Messenger Associate Editor
Mayor Jimmie Hart is proud of Troy.
And, rightfully, he should be.
Hart informed board members Monday night that more than 250 people from several churches in Troy gathered Saturday morning as part of Sharefest to perform odd jobs for Troy area residents and for the town.
He said volunteers painted the inside of the town’s pavilion and several picnic tables at City Park on the square. They also painted light poles black to match the city’s new street signs and blasted flaking paint off the First State Bank building, which the business rents from the town. The crews also trimmed limbs off the dogwood trees near the building. In addition, Hart reported that the town replaced ceiling tiles in a portion of the bank building and the board voted to have the building repainted.
Sharefest is the joining of the churches in Troy to perform acts of service and kindness for those within the community. The purpose of Sharefest is for the community of Christ to demonstrate the love of Christ in practical ways to the community. The churches that participated were Troy First Baptist Church, Troy Church of Christ, Blessed Hope Baptist Church, Troy United Methodist Church, Greater Vision Church of God, Mount Ararat Cumberland Presbyterian Church and New Ebenezer Cum-berland Presbyterian Church.
Hart said seniors from Obion County Central High School also recently helped pick up trash around town for an annual donation to Project Graduation.
The mayor said he has received several positive comments about the town’s new street signs.
The town was also recently inspected by a representative from the Tennessee Occupational Safety & Health Administration and is in 100 percent compliance. Mark Watson said the inspector was impressed with the water plant.
Hart added the water plant is always on the list of places he takes people who are considering relocating to Troy. “It’s so clean you could eat off the floor,” he said.
He said he also takes them to the parks, the schools, the fire station, the police department and the lagoon. “I’m proud of the lagoon. You could eat a picnic lunch on the bank because it doesn’t smell.
“I’m so proud (of the town’s facilities). … I think (the condition of the town’s facilities) bleed over to the general public,” the mayor added, saying residents keep junk picked up out of their yards and keep the town clean.
He said a man who recently moved to Troy has pledged one day each month to pick up litter as well.
In other business, the board:
• Informed a citizen that flooding problems from ditches on Cochran Street will have to be handled by the Tennessee Department of Transportation because it is a state roadway. Hart said he would contact the state.
• Learned bids were to be opened Tuesday for the new spec building at the industrial park and that a meeting to discuss the building with the Industrial Board will be held Thursday after a dinner at The White House.
Watson, who is Industrial Board chairman, said there is a possibility the town will be able to receive a $200,000 loan for two years at no interest to pay for the new building. I
In order to be considered for the no-interest loan, town officials will need to attend a school at the Gibson Electric office May 20 to learn about the advantages and downfalls of spec buildings.
• Heard the town received a $2,000 enhancement grant for the fire department to purchase ham radios.
• Discussed the enhancement grant the town received to build a walking bridge at Trojan Park and learned that more will have to be done than just the bridge because the banks of the ditch are falling in. Hart said it will be best to place culverts in the 10-foot deep ditch, rip rap the bank and pour a concrete header wall.
The mayor said it will be an expensive job, but it needs to be done. Board members agreed.
• Heard a thank you note from Police Chief James Cleek. The town sent him a fruit basket after his recent stay in the hospital.
• While looking over the bills, learned Buckner Engineering is just now being paid by the town for engineering work the company performed on the new entrance to the industrial park.
• Received the animal control report. It included 11 puppies and 11 adult dogs being housed at the town’s facility. They were picked up and taken to Wisconsin and Illinois. One dog was claimed by its owner and another was euthanized.
• Learned several sidewalks noted by the insurance company have been fixed.
Alderman Gene Gurien was absent from the meeting.
Associate Editor Donna Ryder can be contacted by e-mail at dryder@ucmessenger.com.
Published in The Messenger 5.7.08

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