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Davis: Education key to accomplishing goals

Davis: Education key to accomplishing goals

Sgt. Darrell Wayne Davis was born in Obion County in December 1965. Raised by his grandparents, the late J.W. Ware and Alcenia Ware of Union City, he attended the Union City School System.
Along with his academic studies, Davis found time to pursue the athletic outlets that he enjoyed so much, participating in both junior varsity and varsity sports in middle school and high school. He was particularly interested in football.
He graduated from Union City High School in 1984 and joined the work force in the private sector. He also accepted the challenge and privilege of serving his country by joining the Tennessee Army National Guard and was assigned to the 913th Engineer Company, based in Union City. He served honorably with the National Guard for 20 years, retiring in 2004.
While in the National Guard, Davis completed several areas of training, including leadership courses, and he had obtained the rank of E-5 as a sergeant upon his retirement.
In January 1991, Davis was accepted for employment by the Obion County Sheriff’s Department. He served multi-role tasks upon his initial employment, including duties as a radio dispatcher. He was later transferred to the jail staff as a correctional officer. Shortly thereafter, Davis was moved to the position of court bailiff, serving as security for all the courts and conducting prisoner transports as required by the courts.
In 1992, Darrell was accepted by the Tennessee Law Enforcement Training Academy in Donelson as a candidate for Basic Police School. After eight weeks of intense training, the Obion County native graduated from the Police Academy as a Certified Police Officer in the State of Tennessee and was assigned a position as patrol deputy for the Obion County sheriff’s office.
Davis enjoyed the distinction of becoming the first African-American deputy sheriff to have served in that capacity for the Obion County sheriff’s office.
Through the years, he has attended and successfully completed literally hundreds of hours of specialized training, including patrol techniques, self defense, narcotics investigation, clandestine lab investigations and many more.
Davis currently serves as a shift supervisor and has obtained the rank of sergeant. His current duties include serving the public, the prevention and detection of crime, service of process from the courts and general supervision of deputies assigned under his command.
“Education is the key to attaining goals. To begin with, that means applying yourself in elementary school and working hard in middle school and high school,” Davis said. “Sometimes your hopes and dreams for the future will include college. Sometimes it will mean a technical school. Sometimes it will mean training related to the job you want to pursue. Sometimes it involves several different levels and places of learning.
“Education should begin before a child ever gets to kindergarten, however, and it should continue throughout a person’s life. When families put an emphasis on education, they are less likely to run into me as an officer of the law and more likely to find success and satisfaction with their lives.”
Editor’s note: Several prominent local citizens and others who have strong family ties with this community have been asked to write brief stories or provide details about their educational history and their challenges and successes so that the young people in this area may be encouraged to work hard in school and become respected, contributing members of society as well. This effort is part of the celebration of Black History Month in February.
Published in The Messenger 2.26.08

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