Skip to content

No smoking law goes into effect in Tennessee

No smoking law goes into effect in Tennessee

No smoking law goes into effect in Tennessee | no smoking law

NO SMOKING — Jennifer Smith and her son Jonathan join Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen to mark the first day of enforcement of the Non-Smokers Protection Act at an event Monday at Calhoun’s restaurant in Madison. The act, which Bredesen signed into law on
Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen marked the first day of enforcement of the Non-Smokers Protection Act at an event Monday at Calhoun’s restaurant in Madison.
The act, which Bredesen signed into law on June 11, prohibits smoking in all enclosed public areas across the state with few exceptions.
“This is an important step that will have a positive effect on the health of all Tennesseans,” he said. “It’s also a historic occasion as Tennessee becomes the first traditional tobacco state to enact such a comprehensive statewide smoking ban.”
Knoxville-based Calhoun’s went smoke-free at one location two months ago and company-wide Sept. 24. Regional Manager Bart Fricks said the vast majority of Calhoun’s customers wanted cleaner indoor air and have been very satisfied with the change.
“Businesses like this one that went smoke free early recognized that Tennesseans are becoming more and more aware of the risks associated with second-hand smoke,” Bredesen said. “Ultimately, they understand that what is good for our health is also good for business. Today, as the provisions of this Act take effect in workplaces across the state, it will mean healthier living for all the people of Tennessee.”
Commissioner of Health Susan R. Cooper, MSN, RN, believes the Non-Smokers Protection Act is already having a positive impact as call volume to the Tennessee Tobacco QuitLine has increased with the approach of the enforcement deadline.
“While we hope the increased call volume is due to the workplace smoking ban, we are certain too many Tennesseans die each year from preventable tobacco-related illnesses,” she said.
“This is an important day for our state and its citizens, and I hope everyone will honor the provisions of the Non-Smokers Protection Act and recognize the benefits of doing so,” said state Rep. Stratton Bone.
“I believe it’s the right thing for Tennessee, and although it’s a hard thing to do, I hope it will encourage more people to better protect their personal health by giving up smoking,” said state Sen. Jim Tracy.
Beginning Monday, violations of the Non-Smokers Protection Act can be reported by contacting the Department of Health at www.tn.gov/health or by calling 1-800-293-8228. Complaints will then be routed to the appropriate agency for investigation.
For more information on the Non-Smokers Protection Act, including exceptions and frequently asked questions, go to http://health.state.tn.us/smokefreetennessee/. Published in The Messenger 10.02.07

Leave a Comment